Showing all 9 results

Sort by:

  • Alcohol and Drugs at work by: Employee Rescue £17.99

    This guide is your essential step-by-step guide to your employment rights regarding alcohol and drug dependence and what you can do if you are facing disciplinary action for using alcohol or drugs, or for having alcohol or drugs in your possession at work or outside work.

    Alcohol and Drugs at work

    Alcohol and drugs have an impact on your ability to work safely and correctly. Under the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974, your employer has a duty to ensure that the working environment is free from the inappropriate use of substances and all employees are able to carry out their duties in a safe and efficient manner to protect the safety of the workplace. This includes ensuring that no employees are working under the influence of alcohol and drugs. If you are found in possession of controlled substances in contravention of any of the laws listed below, it could still affect your job, if your employer decides that your actions outside of work are sufficiently serious to justify disciplinary action. This would also apply to being under the influence of alcohol outside of work.

    How Employers generally deal with this problem

    Employers have different approaches to alcohol and drug dependency. It can be approached as a disciplinary, health or performance issue or a combination. Remember that your employer is exactly that. Your employer. Not your counsellor or your friend. As such, your Employer will be more interested in your performance or behaviour, rather than the cause of it, and so it is your performance or behaviour that can get you fired from your job. Depending on the behaviour or performance issue that highlights the dependency problem, your Employer may choose to initially treat it as a health problem requiring a capability process, which can be escalated to a disciplinary if the problem persists. If it is a serious performance or behaviour issue, your Employer can go straight to the disciplinary process and you could lose your job.

    The Guide discusses the law, including case law developments that will help you defend yourself.  It covers what you need to know, taking you quickly and simply through essential information on;
    • The applicable law and your legal rights
    • Remedies available to you
    • Case law on alcohol and drug dismissals
    • Guidance on what to do


  • How to survive a criminal charge, conviction or caution at work by: Employee Rescue £9.99

    You can be disciplined and ultimately lose your job for criminal offences occurring at work and outside work. This guide takes you through your rights and the options available to you in such a situation.

    Criminal charge, conviction, caution or police investigation

    If you have received a criminal charge, conviction, been cautioned or are the subject of a police investigation at work, then this is the guide for you. ACAS says that just because you are charged with or convicted of a criminal offence, received a caution or are the subject of a police investigation, is not enough in itself for disciplinary action to be taken against you. Your Employer needs to consider the impact of the charge or conviction on your ability to do the job, and whether the charge or conviction impacts on your work relationships and/or customers.

    If the outcome of your Employers investigation shows that some disciplinary action is necessary, your employer does not have to await the outcome of prosecution before starting the disciplinary procedure. The police should not be asked to conduct any investigation on behalf of your employer, neither should they be present at any meeting or disciplinary meeting.

    This e-book provides you with essential information and guidance on;

    • Your right to silence
    • How to deal with a charge or conviction
    • How to deal with custody or remand
    • Frustration of contract

    And much more.

     


  • How to use the discrimination questions procedure by: Employee Rescue £29.99

    Asking discrimination questions through the Questions Procedure is a way of getting information from your Employer about discrimination you have suffered at work.   It is important for gathering evidence to support your case….flip the book for more

     

     

     


  • How to write a grievance about changes to your employment contract by: Employee Rescue £17.99

    This guide provides in depth direction on writing a grievance about for unauthorised changes to your employment contract. It shows you how to escalate breaches of policy and employment law, strategies and issues of limitation that you need to be aware of.

    What is a grievance?

    The ACAS Code defines grievances as “concerns, problems or complaints that employees raise with their employers”.  You can raise a grievance about things like your terms and conditions of employment, health and safety, workplace relationships, new working practices, organisational changes, equality, discrimination, bullying and harassment, and whistleblowing.   Always try to resolve problems informally before raising a grievance.

    Unauthorised changes to your  employment contract

    This grievance is about the situation where your employer proposes to make changes to your contract, or imposes changes without your permission, or without notifying you. In such a situation, your employer can make changes to particular terms in the contract, or remove the old contract entirely, and replace it with a new one. If your employer has also taken money from your wages without permission, See: How to write a grievance about unauthorised deductions from your wages.
    There are three ways in which employers usually carry out these changes as follows;

    • Propose a change and leave it for you to object. If you don’t object, then you are deemed to have accepted the change through acquiescence. This is sometimes sneaked in by re-issuing a section of an employment contract, updating the employment contract or re- issuing a section 1 statement of employment particulars.
    • Serve notice of the termination of the existing contract and then immediately re-engage you on the new terms.
    • Dismiss all relevant employees and then invite you to reapply for your jobs.

    In order for you to effectively resist these changes, you need to have a basic understanding of employment contracts, what the law allows your employer to do your rights and the options available to you. No matter how you choose to resolve the matter, in this sort of employment relationship problem you should always start by raising a formal grievance. This guide includes explanations of current relevant case law and legal terms. It provides you with the tools to raise an effective grievance about unauthorised changes to your employment contract.

     

     


  • How to write a grievance about the behaviour of a colleague, manager or supervisor by: Employee Rescue £9.99

    This Guide provides in depth direction on writing a grievance about the behaviour of a colleague, manager or supervisor. It shows you how to escalate breaches of policy and employment law, strategies and issues of limitation that you need to be aware of.

    What is a grievance?

    The ACAS Code defines grievances as “concerns, problems or complaints that employees raise with their employers”.  You can raise a grievance about things like your terms and conditions of employment, health and safety, workplace relationships, new working practices, organisational changes, equality, discrimination, bullying and harassment, and whistleblowing.   Always try to resolve problems informally before raising a grievance.

    Complain about the behaviour of a colleague, manager or supervisor

    This guide shows you how to write a grievance about behaviour that you are unhappy with, which is not as serious as bullying and harassment but is causing you to have problems at work.  It helps you lay the foundations for discussions about the behaviour, whilst at the same time formalising your complaint in order to protect you position if matters do not improve. Perhaps your manager or supervisor is making you work in a way that is causing you problems within your team or you have problems with a colleague’s attitude, or capability for the job. Where the grievance is against your line manager, you should approach another manager or raise the issue with your HR department if there is one.

     

     


  • How to write a grievance about unauthorised deductions from your wages or salary by: Employee Rescue £17.99

    This guide provides in depth direction on writing a grievance about unauthorised deductions from your wages or salary. It shows you how to escalate breaches of policy and employment law, strategies and issues of limitation that you need to be aware of.

    What is a grievance?

    The ACAS Code defines grievances as “concerns, problems or complaints that employees raise with their employers”.  You can raise a grievance about things like your terms and conditions of employment, health and safety, workplace relationships, new working practices, organisational changes, equality, discrimination, bullying and harassment, and whistleblowing.   Always try to resolve problems informally before raising a grievance.

    Unauthorised Deductions

    It is an implied term of your employment contract that your employer will pay your wages. In return, you must be ready and willing to perform all of your obligations under the employment contract. Generally, it does not matter whether there is any work for you to do. You are still entitled to pay if you are unable to work through no fault of your own.  You and your employer are free to make any legal arrangements on pay, but your wages must not be less that the National Minimum Wage if you are under 25 or the National Living Wage if you are over 25. You are not entitled to pay for any period of time when you can work, but refuse to work.
    Part 2 of the Employment Rights Act 1996 (ERA 1996) gives you protection against unlawful deductions from wages. This protection extends to those working under a contract of employment, apprentices and individuals who are undertaken to personally perform work or services. If you think you have been underpaid, or that your employer has made an unlawful deduction from your wages, use this guide to understand your rights before taking any action.

    This guide includes explanations of current relevant case law and legal terms. It shows you how to frame a grievance specifically about unauthorised deductions from your wages or salary, explain the net amount you believe that you are owed and on what basis you are making the claim.

     


  • Social Media and Unfair Dismissal by: Employee Rescue £17.99

    By using this e-book you will have the tools to understand and address the different problems that can arise with the Internet, E-mail, Social Media and other electronic communication tools and applications.

    Social Media Dismissal

    Social media is a way of using the internet to interact and share business as well as personal interests with other people all over the world. The 3 main networking sites are Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. In addition to these main players there are various other platforms, blogs, forums and comment spaces on information websites. Suffice it to say that social media is huge and you are probably a user of one or more of these platforms. Together with emails and text messaging, the one thing they all have in common is that using them carelessly may cost you your job and worse.

    You can Tweet and re-Tweet, post status updates, like, comment and share opinions and information instantly with a national and global audience. The problem is that once it’s gone, it’s gone! There are no safeguards, you don’t know where that communication is going and unlike some e-mails, once you hit that button you have no way of recalling what you have sent. Even if you delete your account, the communication can be saved and shared. It remains permanently in the ether to come back and haunt you, when you least expect it.

    Using your personal social media account to share with “friends”, “followers” and “connections” can still cause problems at work because you have no control over who they share your communication and personal information with. Misuse or inappropriate use of social media, email and text messaging can create criminal and civil liability for you and your employer. Most criminal offences that can be committed by using words or images can be committed using social media, and the legal repercussions are the same as off-line activity. There is no specific regulation of social media, so existing employment, criminal, data protection and human rights laws apply.

    The Guide breaks down case law in a user friendly way so that you can easily apply cases to your particular situation.  It covers what you need to know, taking you quickly and simply through essential information on;

    • Your legal rights
    • Case law
    • Remedies and compensation
    • Templates
    • Information and guidance on the use of social media in employment


  • Surviving a disciplinary investigation at work by: Employee Rescue £17.99

    What is a disciplinary investigation?

    A disciplinary investigation is a fact-finding mission. No more and no less. The purpose is to find out on the balance of probabilities whether there is a case to answer. It is not an exercise to find out whether an employee is guilty or not. Workplace investigations can be carried out in a variety of situations, and not just in disciplinary action. Investigations happen for example where there are;

    • Matters of misconduct
    • Capability
    • Bullying and harassment
    • Absence
    • Grievances
    • Whistleblowing allegations

    You continue to have employment rights during the investigation.  The ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures applies to any matters relating to discipline. Your employer has a legal duty to act reasonably and use a fair procedure. The ACAS Guide gives directions on what it is to act reasonably and fairly, and the duties are further developed by the Courts and Tribunals in case law.

    This e-book is your essential step-by-step guide to the workplace investigation process. It includes templates for witness statements and preparing your chronology. It does not just regurgitate generic information about internal investigation, but supplies you with directions on law and processes that you can apply to your own situation. The book has 61 pages of guidance which includes;

    Preparing your statement of defence
    Your rights in whistle-blowing investigations
    The allegations against you
    The investigation/fact-finding meeting
    Your right to confidentiality
    The evidence against you
    Witnesses and witness statements (including anonymous witnesses)
    Investigation of criminal offences at work

     


  • Surviving a workplace suspension by: Employee Rescue £17.99

    This e-book is your essential step-by-step guide to Suspension.  It provides you with information on your legal rights and remedies available to you…flip book over for more