Starting a new job

jobStarting a new job is exciting and daunting at the same time. The chance to meet new people is great, if you like meeting new people but at the same time you need to integrate into a new workplace culture and work hard at becoming one of the team. In the excitement and anticipation of a new job, we often forget to look out for contractual provisions that are important when things are not going so well. You have rights as a job applicant. You also have rights that exist from the moment you start work. Learn about being on probation in your new job and the pitfalls to look out for.

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Disclaimer 

This resource is published by Employee Rescue Limited. Please note that the information and any commentary on the law contained herein is provided free of charge for information purposes only. The information and commentary does not, and is not intended to, amount to legal advice. Employee Rescue accepts no responsibility for any loss occasioned to any person acting or refraining from action as a result of the material contained in this update. Further specialist advice should be taken before relying on the contents of this summary. No part of this summary may be used, reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form without the prior permission of Employee Rescue Ltd.

Case Study

Introduction Employment law recognises three types of working individual for employment status, which are; An Employee A worker (Limb b) A self-employed contractor These categories are very important because it is your employment status that determines your statutory rights at work. Employee’s have all the rights in the Employment Rights Act 1996 (ERA 1996), workers have a few and self-employed individuals have none. In Clyde and Co LLP v Bates van Winkelhof, the Supreme Court said that the law recognises two types of self-employed people. The first type are micro-entrepreneurs or professionals contracting with clients or customers. The second type, who... Read More
The Uber Case [2017] and Worker Status
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