The eight data protection principles

data protect

There are eight principles for handling personal information under Schedule 1, Part 1 of the Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA 1998). Your employer is a “data controller”. These principles require employers to handle personal information safely. Every employer must adhere to the principles.

 

 1

 

Personal data shall be processed fairly and lawfully and, in particular, shall not be processed unless:at least one of the conditions in Schedule 2 of the DPA 1998 is met, and in the case of sensitive personal data, at least one of the conditions in Schedule 3 is also met.

 

 2

 

Personal data shall be obtained only for one or more specified and lawful purposes, and shall not be further processed in any manner incompatible with that purpose or those purposes.

 

 3

 

Personal data shall be adequate, relevant and not excessive in relation to the purpose or purposes for which they are processed.

 

 4

 

Personal data shall be accurate and, where necessary, kept up to date.

 

 5

 

Personal data that is processed for any purpose or purposes shall not be kept for longer than is necessary for that purpose or those purposes.

 

 6

 

Personal data shall be processed in accordance with the rights of data subjects under the DPA 1998.

 

 7

 

Appropriate technical and organisational measures shall be taken against unauthorised or unlawful processing of personal data and against accidental loss or destruction of, or damage to, personal data.

 

 

Personal data shall not be transferred to a country or territory outside the European Economic Area (which includes the EU countries, Liechtenstein, Iceland and Norway) unless that country ensures an adequate level of protection for the rights and freedoms of data subjects in relation to the processing of personal data.

 

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ICO – The Data Protection Principles

 

Case Study

In the Scottish case of Collins v First Quench Retailing Ltd [2003], Ms Jacqueline Collins was awarded £179,000 from her employers when the off-license she managed was robbed. Ms Collins had been the manager of Victoria Wine, run by First Quench Retailing, for about ten years. When Mrs Collins started in the shop she had been concerned about security and raised this with management. Since 1977 there had been 13 reported crimes at the shop, including five thefts, one minor assault, one serious assault and one assault with intent to rob. There were two armed robberies in 1994 and four... Read More
Ms Jacqueline Collins was awarded £179,000 from her employers when the off-license she managed was robbed.Collins v First Quench Retailing Ltd
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