Criminal injuries compensation

cics1

The Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme  

The Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme (CICS) is a government-funded scheme administered by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority (CICA). CICA makes financial awards to compensate people injured in England, Wales and Scotland as a result of violent crime. The injury can be physical, mental or both.

There are three possible types of CICA award:

  • a tariff award, based on the type of injury you have suffered
  • compensation for past and future loss of earnings
  • special expenses compensation

If you are assaulted at work, you can apply for a CICA Award and also pursue a personal injury compensation claim. Get in touch with us for more information and support in making your claims.

Making an application to CICA

Your application will only be considered if it is received on the prescribed CICA form within two years of the incident causing injury. This time limit will be extended only in very limited circumstances.

There is a general rule that any incident for which a claim is being made should be reported to the police straight away. If you don’t do you’re your application may be rejected.

On-line application for compensation for a criminal injury

 

The Five Rules of claiming CICA Compensation

  1. Report the matter immediately to the Police, your employer and the Local Authority (if applicable) and keep details of the report. If the police are involved make sure you have the name and number of the police officer, the incident report number and the address of the police station.
  2. Your application MUST be lodged in time. There is a 2 year time limit from the date of the criminal assault.
  3. Keep your CICA reference safe and quote it any correspondence to CICA.
  4. If your CICA application is rejected there are time limits for the Review and Appeal. You MUST do this within 90 days from the decision that you disagree with.
  5. Keep copies of all your paperwork.

 

What can you do?

  • If you have been attacked or assaulted at work, you may be entitled to make a personal injury compensation claim.  Make sure you record information about the assault.
  • Do not accept compensation from an insurance company acting for your employer without taking legal advice. You may find that you have settled for less than you are actually entitled to.
  • You will need to prove that your injury was caused by the negligence of your employer. We can help you to put your evidence together for your compensation claim.

 

Resources available

How to win your workplace personal injury claim

How to prepare a discrimination schedule of loss for the employment tribunal

How to write a grievance about discrimination at work

How to use the discrimination questions procedure

Disciplinary action and capability

Health and Safety Dismissal

Surviving Capability and Performance Management

Employee Representative Guide for non-union workplaces

DOCUMENTS, FORMS AND LETTER TEMPLATES

You will need to prove that your injury was caused by the negligence of your employer. At Employee Rescue we believe that information is your friend. How to win your Workplace Personal Injury Claim is your essential step-by-step guide to making your personal injury claim for compensation of up to £25,000.00 to cover losses you have suffered as a result of an injury at work. These are called Employer Liability claims. The book takes you quickly and simply through essential information on;

  • Your legal rights
  • Remedies
  • How to get your compensation
  • Templates
  • The latest information on personal injury

The Pre-Action Protocol

You start your claim using the Pre-Action Protocol for Low Value Personal Injury (Employers’ Liability and Public Liability) Claims. The Employee Rescue Guide explains what you must prove, in order to be successful, such as;

  • Identifying that there is a person, company or organisation to make the claim against.
  • Showing that the person, company or organisation owed you a duty of care to avoid your accident and injury, and could have taken steps to avoid the situation.
  • Proving that your injury was caused by the failure of the responsible person or organisation to take reasonable steps to avoid causing your accident or injury.

 

Best of the web

On-line application for compensation for a criminal injury

Criminal injuries compensation authority

A guide to criminal injuries compensation

Citizens Advice – Personal Injuries

Department for Work and Pensions – Compensation, Social Security Benefits and lump sum payments

 

 

Disclaimer

This resource is published by Employee Rescue Limited. Please note that the information and any commentary on the law contained herein is provided for information purposes only. The information and commentary does not, and is not intended to, amount to legal advice. Employee Rescue accepts no responsibility for any loss occasioned to any person acting or refraining from action as a result of the material contained in this publication.

Further specialist advice should be taken before relying on the contents of this publication. You can send an e-mail to thelawyers@employeerescue.co.uk for such specialist advice if required.

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