Refund of Employment tribunal issue and hearing fees

Fees in the Employment Tribunal (ET)

Previously,  everyone who wanted to bring a case (claim) to the ET wouĺd have to pay an “issue fee” when they submit their claim. The issue fee would be followed by payment of a “hearing fee” before the full tribunal hearing.

On 26th July 2017 the Supreme Court ruled that fees for those bringing employment tribunal claims are unlawful, and the government will now have to repay up to £32m to claimants.

 

How to get a refund of fees

Click here to apply for a refund – REFUND MY FEES 

Go direct to the form – Application for refund of Employment Tribunal Fees

 

The  unlawful Fee Regime

Refunds are available for anyone who paid a fee during the unlawful fee regime.

The amount of the fee depends on the type of claim. Simple claims are called “Type A” claims. More complicated claims go to the “Type B” category. You may be able to get help with ET fees if you are unemployed or on a low income. This is called fee remission. Fees can be paid by debit/credit card if you apply online or by cheque/postal order if you post a hard copy of your claim.

Where more than one person is bringing the same claim, the fee structure takes into account the number of people who are bringing the claim.

money

Single claimant claims

See – Employment Tribunal Fees for individuals 

et fees 1

Fee groups

See – Employment Tribunal fees for groups and multiples

et fees 2

Employment tribunal application fees

The following applications to the tribunal have to be paid for;

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* Paid by the person making the application (you)

** Paid by the respondent (your employer)

 

Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT)

Everyone who appeals from the employment tribunal must pay an issue fee once they have submitted their appeal to the EAT. The issue fee is followed by the payment of a hearing fee before the EAT hearing.

See – Appeal to the Employment Appeal Tribunal

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Resources available

Template Letter Before Claim

How to Prepare a Schedule of Loss for the Employment Tribunal

Schedule of Loss Spreadsheet for unfair dismissal

Schedule of loss spreadsheet – Discrimination

ET1: Breach of Contract

ET1: Non-Payment of Holiday Pay on Termination

ET1: Non-Payment of Holiday Pay whilst still employed

ET1: Refusal to permit taking of Annual Leave

 

Disciplinary action and capability

Discrimination at work

Surviving a workplace suspension

How to fight dismissal on Probation

DOCUMENTS, FORMS AND LETTER TEMPLATES

 

Best of the web

 

GOV.UK – Make a claim to an Employment Tribunal

ACAS – Employment Tribunals

 

 

Disclaimer

This resource is published by Employee Rescue Limited. Please note that the information and any commentary on the law contained herein is provided for information purposes only. The information and commentary does not, and is not intended to, amount to legal advice. Employee Rescue accepts no responsibility for any loss occasioned to any person acting or refraining from action as a result of the material contained in this publication.

Further specialist advice should be taken before relying on the contents of this publication. You can send an e-mail to thelawyers@employeerescue.co.uk for such specialist advice if required.

 

Case Study

In the Scottish case of Collins v First Quench Retailing Ltd [2003], Ms Jacqueline Collins was awarded £179,000 from her employers when the off-license she managed was robbed. Ms Collins had been the manager of Victoria Wine, run by First Quench Retailing, for about ten years. When Mrs Collins started in the shop she had been concerned about security and raised this with management. Since 1977 there had been 13 reported crimes at the shop, including five thefts, one minor assault, one serious assault and one assault with intent to rob. There were two armed robberies in 1994 and four... Read More
Ms Jacqueline Collins was awarded £179,000 from her employers when the off-license she managed was robbed.Collins v First Quench Retailing Ltd
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